RELOCATION TO USA

All you need to know when relocating to United State

 

Before relocating to America it is worth doing some research. Still referred to as the ‘Land of Opportunity’, the United States of America is one of the world’s largest economic powers. When moving to the US, especially from the UK, it is good to remember that it has a population of over 300 million people and has 50

separate states with three different time zones. America has seen increased globalisation over more recent years, with American businesses often being large multinational companies. The US Dollar remains one of the strongest and most influential currencies in the world and it is this that has helped the country out of past economic downturns.

 

With such a large landmass, it is difficult to generalise about the many advantages to relocating to America. The country is so diverse that each state can offer different lifestyles, climates, employment opportunities and cost of living. You can enjoy a thriving metropolis, sun-drenched beaches and snow-capped mountains with fantastic ski opportunities. If you thinking about a relocation to America from the UK there are some visa requirements to take into account.

 

Visa requirements

Relocation requirements for moving to the USA

Since 9/11 US policy changes have resulted in much more selective immigration regulations, getting a visa to work is now nowhere near as easy as it was. If you want to work in America you can apply for several types of visa:

A H1-B non-immigrant visa is for skilled, educated people working for a sponsoring employer in specific occupations such as maths, engineering, law or medicine.
A H-2B is for temporary non-agricultural workers and is available for foreign workers doing seasonal work where there is a shortage of local workers.
The J-1 Visa Exchange Visitor Program for people looking to study, teach or carry out research in the US.
The green card – this will entitle you to become a permanent resident. You can obtain a green card through a job or job offer, provided there are not enough US workers who can do the job.